A Diverse Catholic Community Revealing God's Love in the World
Please update your Flash Player to view content.
Menu
WEEKEND MASS:
Saturday: 5:00pm & 7:00pm (Spanish)
Sunday: 7:00am, 8:30am, 10:30am,
12:30pm, 5:30pm (Youth)
DAILY MASS:
Monday - Friday: 7:30am & 9:00am
Saturday: 8:00am
FIRST FRIDAY OF THE MONTH: 7:30pm
RECONCILIATION: SAT. 3:30-4:30pm &
6:15-6:45pm
ST JOSEPH CHURCH
837 Tennent Ave. Pinole, CA 94564
PARISH OFFICE - PARISH CENTER
Regular Hours: Mon-Thu: 9-7:30, Fri: 9-5
(check weekly bulletin for exceptions)
2100 Pear Street - Pinole, CA 94564
510.741.4900 FAX: 510.724.9185
ST. JOSEPH SCHOOL
1961 Plum Street, Pinole, CA 94564
510.724.0242 FAX 510.724.9886
This Week's Bulletin Letter 

The following is the letter published in the most recent St. Joseph Catholic Church in Pinole weekly bulletin. You may click on one of the buttons at right to access this week's bulletin, previous bulletin letters, and the previous bulletins dating back to 2006.

This Week's Bulletin

Bulletin Letters

Previous Bulletins

November Blessings

This weekend we are remembering and praying for the faithful departed at all our Masses, and will continue to pray throughout the month of November in a concerted way for all the Holy Souls in Purgatory. On All Saints Day, November 1st, we celebrate and give thanks to God for all who are already in Heaven, who after having lived and died with Christ, now share in his glory forever. They already know and live the fullness of life even though we continue to anticipate the resurrection of the body on the last day.  “For this is the will of my Father, that everyone who sees the Son and believes in him may have eternal life, and I shall raise him on the last day” (Jn 6:40).  Our prayers for the faithful departed do not benefit the saints in heaven, rather those in purgatory.

The Holy Souls in Purgatory, according to the teaching of the Catholic Church, are no longer at risk of eternal damnation, but are in a state of purification as they continue to atone for the sins they committed in life and the ways that they failed to fully convert to Christ. Conversion is a life-long process, even for those who more generously embrace the cross throughout life.  “We know that our old self was crucified with him, so that our sinful body might be done away with, that we might no longer be in slavery to sin…If, then, we have died with Christ, we believe that we shall also live with him” (Rom 6:6-8).  Blessed Mother Teresa of Calcutta and St. John Paul II are contemporary examples of Christians who embraced the cross wholeheartedly, while we can probably think of many others who were sincere in their love for God and neighbor, but perhaps did not progress in their conversion as eagerly.  Purgatory is a place where we make amends for the ways we languish in our faith.  “For if before men, indeed, they be punished, yet is their hope full of immortality; chastised a little, they shall be greatly blessed, because God tried them and found them worthy of himself” (Wis 3:4-5).  Purgatory is not a place to fear, but we do well for ourselves and others by following the two commandments we heard in last week’s gospel (Mt 22:34-40) to the very best of our ability.  Praying for the faithful departed is a work of mercy, and our generous prayers and charity helps them as well as prepares us for our eternal reward. 

November is also a month in which we count our blessings and give thanks. I am particularly thankful for the past month.  We began the month of October with Oktoberfest, our annual parish festival.  After totaling the receipts and expenses we are happy to report a net income of $31,549.00, half of which will benefit our parish school, and the other half will help to support our parish ministries. The following is a summary breakdown of the result of much work & fun. Also, throughout the month of October we continued the annual tradition of counting the number of adults and children attending our Saturday evening vigil Masses and our Sunday Masses.  Here are the numbers of our average Mass attendance:        

                                Adults  Children                                   Oktoberfest

Saturday          5 pm    271      25                                Children’s games & activities  $4,874

         (Spanish)7 pm    168      33                                Food and snack booths              $9,926

Sunday            7 am    199      4                                  Raffle sales                                $8,766

                    8:30 am   337      25                                Other fund raiser booths            $6,073

                    10:30 am   472      76                                    Pasta dinner & Pancake brkfst   $1,910

                    12:30 am   370      71                                    Total                                              $31,549

                      5:30 pm   413      79

Total average:           2,230     313      2,543  

Thank you to all of our parish ushers for making the October count. This data is reported to the diocese of Oakland and is assimilated with other local, national and universal statistics on the Catholic Church. Thank you once again to all who sponsored and supported our parish festival. It was a great success and we look forward to Oktoberfest #37!

Today in the Catholic Church

Mass Readings (Audio)

Mass Readings (Audio)

Daily Readings from the New American Bible

Readings from the official New American Bible and Vatican approved for use in U.S. Catholic parishes.

Today's Saint

Today's Saint

CNA - Saint of the Day

  • The Solemnity of All Saints is celebrated on the first of November. It was instituted to honour all of the saints, both known and unknown, and, according to Pope Urban IV, to supply any deficiencies in the faithful's celebration of saints' feasts during the year. In the early days of the Church, the Christians were accustomed to solemnize the anniversary of a martyr's death for Christ at the place of martyrdom. In the fourth century, neighbouring dioceses began to interchange feasts, to transfer relics, to divide them, and to join in a common feast; as is shown by the invitation of Saint Basil of Caesarea (397) to the bishops of the province of Pontus. Frequently groups of martyrs suffered on the same day, which naturally led to a joint commemoration.In the persecution of Diocletian, the number of martyrs became so great that a separate day could not be assigned to each, but the Church, feeling that every martyr should be venerated, appointed a common day for all. The first trace of this we find is in Antioch on the Sunday after Pentecost. We also find mention of a common day in a sermon of Saint Ephrem the Syrian (373), and in the 74th homily of Saint John Chrysostom (407). At first only martyrs and Saint John the Baptist were honoured by a special day in the Liturgical Calendar. Other saints were added gradually, and increased in number when a regular process of canonization was established. Still, as early as 411 there is in the Chaldean Calendar a "Commemoratio Confessorum" for the Friday after Easter. In the west, Pope Boniface IV on May 13, 609 or 610, consecrated the Pantheon in Rome to the Blessed Virgin and all the martyrs, ordering an anniversary. Gregory III (731-741) consecrated a chapel in the Basilica of Saint Peter to all the saints and fixed the anniversary for November 1. A basilica of the Apostles already existed in Rome, and its dedication was annually remembered on May 1. Gregory IV (827-844) extended the celebration on November 1 to the entire Church. The vigil seems to have been held as early as the feast itself. The octave was added by Sixtus IV (1471-84). Francis Merseman, from the Catholic Encyclopedia, copyright 1907.

Considering becoming a Catholic?

Considering Becoming a Catholic?

Click on the photo for more information.

Been away from the Church awhile?

Been away from the church?

Welcome back home! 
If you have any questions or concerns, please feel free to call the parish office at 510-741-4900 and ask to talk to a priest.  We are here to serve you.

Welcome New Parishioners!

We welcome you to St. Joseph Parish with open arms (and big hats)!

Welcome to St. Joseph!
Click on the photo for more information about becoming a member of our parish.

Go to top